Bachelor of Science in Psychology

By studying human behavior, you will learn how people think and how they act, so you can improve lives and effect change in the world.

Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Psychology, the science of human behavior.   

  • Maria’s Psychology program provides students with several different areas of study, including a very board, general approach into understanding human behavior in schools, hospitals, and in various workplace settings and organizations.   
  • Maria’s Psychology program also has a specific focus on Health & Wellness.

Our bachelor’s in Psychology with a focus on health & wellness will prepare students to:   

  • Increase personal strength and resilience, and to promote healthy behaviors for one’s well-being.  
  • Help patients handle illness, whether it’s helping them to follow medical advice, control their pain, or change poor health habits regarding their overall well-being.   
  • Develop the administrative, ethical, and professional skills for leadership positions in health care fields.   
  • Utilize knowledge to educate individuals and communities on their overall well-being.   
  • Understand prevention and treatment of substance use disorders.  
  • Enroll in graduate education programs in psychology.  

OUR STUDENTS

Many students enter this program right out of high school and live locally in the Capital Region, such as Albany and Schenectady High Schools. Maria College is great for students looking to live at home and commute to campus.  

We also have a large population of transfer students coming to Maria after attending or graduating from a community college or from other regional four-year colleges, such as Hudson Valley Community College and SUNY Schenectady.

Returning students come to Maria looking to complete or further their education in the health care field. Many of these students come from both private and public sectors within the field of health care. 

FEATURED HEALTH & WELLNESS COURSES:

Our small class sizes create a very comfortable, engaging and rewarding learning experience.

  • Psychology of Food & Eating
  • Health Psychology
  • Introduction to Substance Abuse and Alcoholism
  • Health Promotion Across the Lifespan
  • Culture, Health, and Healing
  • Positive Psychology
  • Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that opportunities within the field of health & wellness is expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations due to efforts to promote a healthier lifestyle to improve health outcomes and avoid costly medical treatments. The Bachelor of Science degree in psychology with an emphasis in health & wellness will provide you with a solid foundation for careers in health settings such as hospitals, social service agencies, mental health centers, substance abuse treatment clinics, college health services/schools, consulting firms, and community centers.  

  • Program Learning Goals & Outcomes

    Goal 1:  Knowledge Base in Psychology

    1.1 Describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes in psychology.
    1.2 Develop a working knowledge of psychology’s content domains.
    1.3 Describe applications of psychology.

    Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry & Critical Thinking

    2.1 Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena.
    2.2 Demonstrate psychology information literacy.
    2.3 Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem solving.
    2.4 Interpret, design, and conduct basic psychological research.
    2.5 Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry.

    Goal 3: Ethical & Social Responsibility in a Diverse World

    3.1 Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice.
    3.2 Build and enhance interpersonal relationships.
    3.3 Adopt values that build community at local, national, and global levels.

    Goal 4: Communication

    4.1 Demonstrate effective writing for different purposes.
    4.2 Exhibit effective presentation skills for different purposes.
    4.3 Interact effectively with others.

    Goal 5: Professional Development

    5.1 Apply psychological content and skills to career goals.
    5.2 Exhibit self-efficacy and self-regulation.
    5.3 Refine project-management skills.
    5.4 Enhance teamwork capacity.
    5.5 Development meaningful professional direction for life after graduation.

  • Course Overview

     

    Group I: Psychology Core (27 credits)

    Course

     

    Credits

    PSY 100

    General Psychology

    3

    PSY 102 

    PSY 225

    Exploratory Psychology

    or Health Psychology

    3

    PSY 205 

    Interpersonal Psychology

    3

    PSY 350 

    Research Methods I

    3

    PSY 360 

    Research Methods II

    3

    PSY 400 

    Internship in Psychology

    6

    PSY 430 

    History and Systems of Psychology

    3

    PSY 450 

    Capstone in Psychology

    3

    Group II: Psychology Electives

    (Select 7 courses with three at 300/400 level)

    PSY 200 

    Developmental Psychology

    3

    PSY 201 

    Psychology of Learning

    3

    PSY 202 

    Adolescence Psychology

    3

    PSY 203 

    Child Psychology

    3

    PSY 204 

    Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

    3

    PSY 209 

    Psychology of Aging

    3

    PSY 232 

    Positive Psychology

    3

    PSY 270 

    Social Psychology

    3

    PSY 300

    Organizational Change

    3

    PSY 305

    Psychology of Food and Eating

    3

    PSY 315 

    Psychology of Criminal Behavior

    3

    PSY 320 

    Psychology and the Media

    3

    PSY 330 

    Psychology of Terrorism

    3

    PSY 340 

    Cognitive Psychology

    3

    Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses
    (48 credits)
    Cultural Studies (6 credits): CUL 310, CUL 410

    English (12 credits): ENG 111, ENG 211,
    ENG 300 or 400 level electives (6 credits)

    History (6 credits): HIS electives
    Religious Studies/Philosophy (12 credits):
    RES 201, 9 credits of RES/PHI electives

    Science/Mathematics (9 credits): MAT 106 or MAT 101,
    MAT 200; any BIO/CHM/PHY/SCI elective

    Sociology (3 credits): SOC 101

    Free Electives (24 credits)
    18 credits at any level
    6 credits at the 300/400 level

    FEATURED COURSES
    Our small class sizes create a very comfortable, engaging and rewarding learning experience.

    • Case Management
    • Health Psychology
    • Psychology of Food and Eating
    • Positive Psychology
    • Culture, Health and Healing
    • Substance and Behavioral Addictions
    • Health Promotion Across the Lifespan
  • Course Sequence

    First Year: First Semester                 

    Course

     

    Credits

    ENG 111

    Composition I

    3

    PSY 100

    Intro to Psychology

    3

    SOC 101

    Intro to Social Change

    3

    RES/PHI

    Religious Studies/Phil. Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    15

    First Year: Second Semester

    MAT 106

    MAT 101

    College Algebra or

    Found. Of Math. I

    3

    PSY 102

    PSY 225

    Exploratory Psychology or

    Health Psychology

    3

    PSY 205

    Psychology of Interpersonal Relations

    3

    RES/PHI

    Religious Studies/Philosophy Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    15

    Second Year: First Semester                 

    ENG 211

    Critical Inquiry and Writing

    3

    MAT 200

    Statistics

    3

    HIS

    History Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 200 Level Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 200 Level Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    18

    Second Year: Second Semester

    RES 201

    Foundations in Social Justice

    3

    BIO/CHM/PHY/SCI

    Science Elective

    3

    HIS

    History Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 200 Level Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 200 Level Elective

    3

       

    15

    Third Year: First Semester              

    CUL 310

    Cultural Studies I

    3

    PSY 350

    Research Methods I

    3

    ENG

    English 300/400 Level Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 300/400 Level Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    15

    Third Year: Second Semester

    CUL 410

    Cultural Studies II

    3

    PSY 360

    Research Methods II

    3

    RES/PHI

    Religious Studies/Philosophy Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 300 Level Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    15

    Fourth Year: First Semester                 

    PSY 430

    History and Systems of Psychology

    3

    ENG

    English 300/400 Level Elective

    3

    PSY

    Psychology 300/400 Level Elective

    3

     

    Free Elective, 300/400 Level

    3

     

    Free Elective, 300/400 Level

    3

       

    15

    Fourth Year: Second Semester

    PSY 400

    Internship in Psychology

    6

    PSY 450

    Capstone in Psychology

    3

     

    Free Elective

    3

       

    12

  • Course Descriptions

    PSY 099 – Topics in Psychology
    Restricted to incoming HEOP students, this course is an introduction to psychology as a science. Topics covered include the history and scope of psychology, introduction to research and the brain, and a beginning understanding of memory improvement and motivational concepts.

    PSY 100 – General Psychology
    This course introduces students to the major theories and concepts in contemporary psychology. Topics covered included the approaches and research methods in psychology, the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, consciousness, motivation and emotion, intelligence, personality, social psychology, and mental illness.

    PSY 101 – Introduction to Social Change
    This course will provide a study of human behavior and how it is affected by social and cultural processes. Social groups, social institutions, social processes are analyzed to determine impact on persons in today’s society. The 135 psychological components of social change and their impact on social order are to be evaluated. Cross-listed as SOC 101

    PSY 102 – Exploratory Psychology
    This course explores several topics or areas from General Psychology in a more critical and in-depth process. the purpose of the course is to engage students in critical inquiry about contemporary significant and practical concerns in the field of psychology. It is expected that students will have greater awareness of and interest in specific fields of psychology.

    PSY 200 – Developmental Psychology
    The scientific study of the individual across the life span: a study and application of physical, cognitive and behavioral processes across contexts. Prerequisite: PSY 100 with a grade of C or better

    PSY 202 – Adolescent Psychology
    A survey of the various adjustments encountered by adolescents: psychosexual problems, dependence and independence conflicts, inferiority feelings, drug abuse and the problems of the self-image. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 203 – Child Psychology
    Practical application of scientific knowledge to an understanding of the child as a developing personality. The phases of development, major mental aspects and their determination, interest and behavior patterns are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 204 – Psychology of Abnormal Behavior
    Minor and major variants of behavior. History of treatment of disordered personalities. The nature of maladjustment, neuroses, psychoses and other variances from normal behavior are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 205 – Psychology of Interpersonal Relations
    The application of basic principles and concepts of interpersonal relationships. Topics include verbal and nonverbal communication, personality styles and levels of maturity. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 209 – Psychology of Aging
    Study of the psychological effects that events such as retirement, illness, loss of capacity and the prospect of death have on the elderly. It will also examine physiological, sociological, economic and psychological changes the elderly will encounter. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 225 – Health Psychology
    This course provides an overview of the growing field of health psychology. Health psychology explores the bidirectional relationship between a person’s mind and body, with a focus on how thought patterns, attitudes, and cognitions affect healthy behaviors and ultimately, health outcomes. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 232 – Positive Psychology
    This course will examine the scientific research on happiness and its application in the areas of positive individual traits, positive emotions and positive institutions. Productivity, health, successful aging, spirituality and national wellbeing are all functions of happiness. Students will explore the practical ways to promote and maintain happiness, compassion, optimism, wellness, gratitude, mindfulness, creativity and flow, and how to strengthen positive character traits in themselves and others. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 235 – Introduction to Alcoholism and Substance Abuse
    This course examines alcoholism and substance abuse from historical, biological, psychological, social, and cultural perspectives. It presents theoretical frameworks that help students understand the nature and course of substance abuse and dependency, as well as strategies to prevent its onset. The course introduces the assessment and diagnostic process as well as treatment approaches. Prerequisite: PSY 100 with a grade of C or better.

    PSY 270 – Social Psychology
    This course introduces the student to the scientific study of how individuals think, feel and behave in social situations. It applies the scientific method of systematic observation, description, and measurement in the study of the human condition. This course, while relating the foundations of social psychology, will give special attention to understanding the applications of social-psychological knowledge that have been implemented, extending the reach of the field. Social psychologists are often called on to make contributions in business, medicine, law, and other fields. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 300 – Organizational Change
    Organizational Change examines the nature, defintions, theories and aspects of organizational culture, to help develop an understanding of the principles of organizational change theory that apply to both short-and long-term changes. Analysis covers patterns of behavior and their relationship to organizational culture, especially the impact of the organization’s business on employee behavior and culture. Topics include the role of nationality, gender, and 137 race within organizational culture; implications of addressing organizational challenges; theory versus practice; and the relative roles of the individual, groups and the organization in a cultural context. The goal is to apply knowledge of organizational culture to develop a change-management plan. Prerequisite: Any PSY 200-level course

    PSY 302 – Medical Sociology
    This course will be a study of a sociological perspective on health, illness and wellness. Disparities in health and health outcomes will be emphasized. Institutional structures and social supports will be reviewed, along with current health care reform proposals. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of instructor; Cross-listed SOC 300

    PSY 305 – Psychology of Food and Eating
    This course will explore the psychological meanings of food and eating and its effects on the health and wellness of humans. Some of the topics to explore include: the cultural evolution of food and eating, learning processes and eating behaviors, social and developmental influences on eating and food preference, the brain; mood, cravings, addiction, obesity, eating disorders and body image. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 315 – Psychology of Criminal Behavior
    This course will cover the psychology of violent criminal behavior from multiple perspectives. The course begins by exploring the different theories behind criminal behavior, including the biological, the psychological, the sociological, and those that concern social learning and developmental risk. The course then moves beyond the theoretical to consider the relationship between mental illness and criminal behavior, and the interface with the judicial system and the media. Students will examine an array of cases depicting perpetrators of violent crimes, and study and apply the methods used in the psychological profiling of criminals. Prerequisite: PSY 100

    PSY 320 – Psychology and the Media
    This course explores the evolution of the media and its influence on human behavior. Students will analyze the relationship between media and psychology in relationship to culture, ethical and legal issues. Students also examine ethical and legal issues related to the psychology and the media. Current and future trends and challenges will be discussed as well as media’s impact on social change. Prerequisite: Any PSY 200 level course

    PSY 321 – Cultures, Health and Healing
    This course provides a broad exploration of the study of human health, disease and curing from a cross-cultural, historical, anthropological and evolutionary perspective, with an emphasis on the cultural and bio-cultural factors that shape how response to diseases and illness involve social dynamics, cultural values and collective expectations. Societies throughout the world recognize certain bodily, emotional, and mental conditions as undesirable and in need of change. In this course, the interactions of non-western cultures with systems of western health are explored in a global context. Prerequisite: SOC 101; Cross-listed CUL 320

    PSY 340 – Cognitive Psychology
    This course is designed to provide a solid and broad introduction to human cognition. It is the study of internal mental processes including perception, attention, memory, knowledge, language, decision making, and problem solving. The course will cover basic theoretical models, classic and recent research, new developments in theory, and applications in several areas including design, education, and training. Prerequisite: Any PSY 200 level course

    PSY 350 – Research Methods I
    This course provides students with the foundation they will need to be discerning consumers of psychological research. Emphasis will be on the theoretical and practical aspects of the research techniques used in this field. Topics included will be the methods used by psychologists to obtain information; the properties essential in using these methods for forming appropriate conclusions; and the statistical analysis employed that shape the interpretation that psychologists use to communicate their findings. Prerequisites: PSY 100, MAT 200

    PSY 360 – Research Methods II
    This course continues the work from Research Methods I, with a focus on more advanced statistical analyses of data and their interpretations and uses. The essential parts of a research proposal will be stressed and students will be trained on how to critically analyze research works. Students will be provided with the tools necessary to carry out a proposal. Prerequisites: PSY 350

    PSY 400 – Internship in Psychology
    The Internship in Psychology consists of a supervised work experience with professional practitioners in an agency, company, institution, organization or 139 school. The internship is designed to provide a diverse array of program-relevant experiential learning activities that enhance the students’ communication skills, cognitive skills and professional skills, and, as a capstone activity, is intended to offer students the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills, to utilize critical thinking and informed analysis, and to augment their subject matter knowledge in Psychology. A minimum of 120 total hours of internship work for 3 credits and 240 total hours of internship work for 6 credits is required. The internship is graded as pass/fail. Prerequisites: Students must be in their final year of the Psychology program and in good academic standing

    PSY 411 – Health Promotion across the Life Span
    This course explores sociological and public health concepts in the study of health through the life span. Topics of race, class, gender and culture will be broadly studied as they influence attitudes and behaviors towards health. Health will be defined in terms of age-expected changes and population health promotion priorities. Social detriments of health will be discussed as methods to explore how programs, practices and policies in these areas affects health of individuals, families and communities. the 6 credit sections of this course includes the 3-credits of experimental learning. Prerequisites: SOC 101 and ENG 300; Corss-listed with SOC 411

    PSY 420 – Independent Study
    This course offers an opportunity for students at an advanced level of study in aa bachelor degree program and in good academic standing to undertake an independent project under the supervision of a faculty member. A maximum of 6 credits of independent study at the 220 and/or 420 level can be earned for a bachelor’s degree. A detailed proposal and advisor approval are required prior to registration for an independent study. Course is restricted to bachelor degree students.

    PSY 430 – History and Systems of Psychology
    This course provides students with an overview of the historical antecedents and major theoretical systems found in psychology. It surveys the history of psychology from the early Greek philosophers, through the predecessors of the psychological movement, to the beginning of psychology and its contemporary form. Prerequisites: Students must be in their final year of the Psychology program

  • Articulation Agreements

    Transfer Agreements

    • Columbia-Greene Community College graduates with AS in Social Science to BS in Psychology at Maria College
    • Fulton-Montgomery Community College graduates with AA in Liberal Arts and Sciences: General Studies to BS in Psychology at Maria College
    • Schenectady County Community College graduates with AA in Liberal Arts: Humanities and Social Services with concentration in Psychology to BS in Psychology at Maria College

    Graduate Agreements

    • Maria College graduates with BS in Psychology to MS in Forensic Mental Health at the Sage Colleges
    • Maria College graduates with BS in Psychology to MS in Counseling and Community Psychology at the Sage Colleges
  • Psychology Minor

    Maria College offers all students enrolled at the bachelor’s degree level the opportunity to complete a minor program of study in Psychology.

    Requirements:

    • Only open to students currently enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program.
    • Minimum of 18 credits in psychology.
    • A minimum grade of C must be earned in all psychology courses in the minor.
    • One required course: PSY 100, Introduction to Psychology.
    • Residency requirement: A student must complete a minimum of six credits of psychology at Maria College.
    • A minimum of six (6) credits must be at the 300/400 level.
    • Remaining credits should be selected by the student and advisor to plan a set of courses which is most appropriate for the student.

    Special Considerations:

    • Double Counting Courses: Up to two courses (6 credits) from the student’s major may be counted toward the minor requirement. (Note: When a course fulfills two or more requirements, it does not reduce the total number of credits required for graduation.)
    • Variable Credit Courses: Some courses, e.g., PSY 220 and 420, Independent Study, can be taken for variable credit. The maximum number of such credits that can be counted toward the minor is 3 credits.

What can I do with this major?

Students will develop a customized career or educational pathway. An internship, designed by you and your advisor, will be the cornerstone for transforming relevant knowledge and skills into a career plan for entering the workforce or continuing your education at the graduate school level.

Read More

Internships Examples:

  • Addiction Recovery Centers
  • City Drug Courts
  • Local school districts
  • Catholic Charities
  • Parsons Child & Family Center
  • Center for Disability Services
  • Albany County Probation Services
  • NYSDOCCS
  • Ronald McDonald House
  • Nursing Home Management
  • Albany Therapeutic Riding Center
  • Spotted Zebra

After Graduation

Graduate Studies:

  • Healthy Psychology
  • Mental Health Counseling
  • Nutrition Science
  • Public Health and Promotion
  • School Psychology
  • Social Welfare
  • Health Educator

Employment:

  • Clinical Care Coordinator
  • Mental Health and Addiction Counselor
  • Probation Officer
  • Public Health and Prevention educator
  • School Counselor
  • Social & Human Services
Close

What can I do with this major?

Students will develop a customized career or educational pathway. An internship, designed by you and your advisor, will be the cornerstone for transforming relevant knowledge and skills into a career plan for entering the workforce or continuing your education at the graduate school level.

Read More

Internships Examples:

  • Addiction Recovery Centers
  • City Drug Courts
  • Local school districts
  • Catholic Charities
  • Parsons Child & Family Center
  • Center for Disability Services
  • Albany County Probation Services
  • NYSDOCCS
  • Ronald McDonald House
  • Nursing Home Management
  • Albany Therapeutic Riding Center
  • Spotted Zebra

After Graduation

Graduate Studies:

  • Healthy Psychology
  • Mental Health Counseling
  • Nutrition Science
  • Public Health and Promotion
  • School Psychology
  • Social Welfare
  • Health Educator

Employment:

  • Clinical Care Coordinator
  • Mental Health and Addiction Counselor
  • Probation Officer
  • Public Health and Prevention educator
  • School Counselor
  • Social & Human Services
Close
Maria Stories
Leanna Dorsey

Leanna Dorsey describes her experience as a student in the Maria College Psychology BS program and how it helped place her on an exciting career path.

Professor teaching a psychology class

Assistant Professor, Joseph Castro gives us a glimpse into the classroom of a ‘Positive Psychology’ lecture.

Kari Lentchner, Psychology

Kari Lentchner '18, Psychology BS, came to Maria with the intention of becoming a nurse. Because of her passion and work experience for the field of Autism, she was introduced to Maria's psychology major.